Those Winter Sundays

In the poem “Those Winter Sundays”, Robert Hayden, the author, recalled how gentle of his father and his childhood, but he did not appreciate what his father did. When he grew up, he realized that he is unfilial and regret what he did to his father. His father needs to work on every weekday. On Sundays, he also got up early when the sun has not risen. He wore his clothes in the cold morning with his ached hand. It meant he works are very hard. He kept working for the family in the weekend, but no one thanks him. Hayden was regretting why he did not realize what he father did for the family. His father woke him up when the room became warm in the cold winter. He dressed slowly because he feared the chronic angers of the family. The second stanza shows that his father really loves this family, but there are problems in this family to make Hayden fear. His father helped the family to drive the cold and polished Hayden’s shoe, but he spoke impolite to his dad. The last sentence of the poem shows that Hayden is too regretful for hurting his father feeling and ignoring his austere and lonely.

This poem reminded me what I did to my parents. When I was studying in high school, I had haven a part time job. I always went back home at the midnight, so I see my parents infrequently even though we lived together. My parents always wanted to care for me, so they always called me and asked me some recent situation, but I always impolite to them. I used to think they are very troublesome to ask me too many questions of my life. However, I realized how much my parents love me when I came to Dallas. Their calls are the most wonderful things in the world.

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